Google and Apple Compared to the British East India Company by Shaadi.com Founder

Anupam Mittal, the founder of Shaadi.com and a judge on Shark Tank India, has drawn a striking comparison between tech giants Google and Apple and the British East India Company. According to Mittal, both companies operate with “complete impunity” and unfairly impose high fees on app developers.

The core issue lies in Google’s user choice billing system, which charges app developers a service fee of 11% to 26% for downloads of paid apps and in-app purchases from the Play Store. Mittal argues that this practice is unjust. The Competition Commission of India (CCI) had addressed the issue by ordering no discrimination in Google’s billing system. However, Mittal remains dissatisfied as transactions occurring on apps downloaded through the Play Store are still subjected to a 15-30% tax or commission.

In an interview with Business Insider, Mittal expressed his frustration, stating that tech giants like Google and Apple essentially want 50% of startup revenues, likening their behavior to that of the British East India Company. He criticized their arrogance and disregard for compliance. Mittal strongly advocates for penal provisions against these companies, suggesting that penalties alone are inadequate. He believes that such “bullies” should face severe consequences to ensure they do not abuse or manipulate the law.

In summary, Anupam Mittal, the founder of Shaadi.com, has compared Google and Apple to the British East India Company, accusing both tech giants of operating with impunity. Mittal specifically criticizes the steep fees imposed by Google’s user choice billing system and calls for more stringent penalties against these companies to protect the interests of startups.

An FAQ section based on the main topics and information presented in the article:

Q: What is the core issue between tech giants Google and Apple and the British East India Company?
A: The core issue is that both Google and Apple operate with “complete impunity” and unfairly impose high fees on app developers.

Q: What is Google’s user choice billing system?
A: Google’s user choice billing system charges app developers a service fee of 11% to 26% for downloads of paid apps and in-app purchases from the Play Store.

Q: How has the Competition Commission of India addressed this issue?
A: The Competition Commission of India (CCI) ordered no discrimination in Google’s billing system.

Q: Why does Mittal remain dissatisfied?
A: Mittal remains dissatisfied because transactions occurring on apps downloaded through the Play Store are still subjected to a 15-30% tax or commission.

Q: What is Mittal’s opinion on the behavior of tech giants like Google and Apple?
A: Mittal believes that tech giants like Google and Apple essentially want 50% of startup revenues and likened their behavior to that of the British East India Company. He criticizes their arrogance and disregard for compliance.

Q: What does Mittal advocate for in terms of penalties against these companies?
A: Mittal advocates for more stringent penalties against these companies and believes that penalties alone are inadequate. He believes that severe consequences should be imposed to ensure they do not abuse or manipulate the law.

Definitions for key terms or jargon used within the article:

1. Impunity: Freedom from punishment or negative consequences.
2. App Developers: Individuals or companies that create and develop applications (apps) for smartphones and other devices.
3. In-App Purchases: Transactions made within a mobile app to purchase additional features or content.
4. Play Store: The official app store for Android devices, where users can download apps, games, and other digital content.
5. Startups: Newly established companies with innovative business models or products.

Suggested related links to main domain:

Shaadi.com – Link to the main domain of Shaadi.com, the dating and matrimonial website founded by Anupam Mittal.

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